Definition of discrimination

Discrimination is the practice of treating someone differently for that reason person’s perceived status or characteristics. Discrimination has been common in human societies, and sociologists study why and how it happens to be able to get to know how people communicate with each other. Discrimination can be positive (in support of an individual), as if somebody is provided employment because of that person’s sex. However, discrimination is often discussed as negative – for instance, when someone is barred from voting because of that person’s race. Whenever a society commonly practices discrimination via its processes and institutions, it is institutionalized; for instance, if hospitals and health organizations consistently treat and research men’s health problems greater than women’s health problems, they participate in institutional discrimination against women.

Direct Discrimination

Direct Discrimination is the place someone is treated less favorably than another person because of a protected characteristic they have or are believed to have (see Perceptive Discrimination below), or because they keep company with somebody who has a protected characteristic (see Associative Discrimination below).

Associative Discrimination

This already pertains to Race, Religion or Belief and Sexual Orientation. It is now extended to cover Age, Disability, Gender Reassignment and Sex. This is direct discrimination against someone simply because they keep company with another person who possesses a protected characteristic.

Perceptive Discrimination

This already pertains to Age, Race, Religion or Belief and Sexual Orientation. It is now extended to pay for Disability, Gender Reassignment and Sex. This really is direct discrimination against an individual because others think they have a very particular protected characteristic. It applies even if the person does not actually hold the characteristic.

Indirect Discrimination

This already pertains to Age, Race, Religion or Belief, Sex, Sexual Orientation and Marriage and Civil Partnership. It is now extended to cover Disability and Gender Reassignment.

Indirect Discrimination can happen when you have a condition, rule, policy or perhaps a practice in your organization that pertains to everyone but particularly disadvantages individuals who share a protected characteristic.

Harassment

Harassment is “unwanted conduct associated with another protected characteristic that has the reason or aftereffect of violating an individual’s dignity or creating intimidating, hostile, degrading, humiliating or offensive environment for your individual”.

Employees will now have the ability to complain of behavior they find offensive even if it’s not fond of them, and also the complainant do not need to hold the relevant characteristic themselves. Workers are also protected against harassment because of perception and association.

3rd party Harassment

This already applies to Sex. It is now likely to cover Age, Disability, Gender Reassignment, Race, Religion or Belief and Sexual Orientation.

The Equality Act makes you potentially responsible for harassment of your employees by people (third parties) who aren’t employees of your company, such as customers or clients.

Victimization

Victimization is the place an employee is treated badly because they make or supported a complaint or raised a grievance underneath the Equality Act; or since they’re suspected of doing so. The Equality Act amends the definition ‘victimization’, to ensure that no longer needs to suggest to some comparator.